lunes, 22 de mayo de 2017

6 Years Already?

Time flies!  It's been 6 years blogging about my experiences with Linux!

I've learned a lot, although I still haven't mastered the CLI (and probably never will).

I've also seen some of my favorite distros disappear, but they have been replaced by others equally great or even greater.

I've seen some other successful migrants among many who don't stay beside the penguin.

I've seen as well how Linux gets better and better, and how that other OS has started to copy it.

However, the greatest things I've experienced since I came to Linux Land are:

Freedom and peace of mind!  While many are utterly worried and Wannacry, I am happy with my systems.  :D

CHEERS!!!

sábado, 29 de abril de 2017

My View on the Article "Is the Open Source Software Movement a Technological Religion?"

I read the article "Is the Open Source Software Movement a Technological Religion?," in which Gil Yehuda compares the movement to religion.

Although he has some interesting points, I think actually closed source or proprietary software advocates are the ones who seem much more to be into a religion.

Why?  To put it simply:

1.  Their leaders hide the truth (the code, flaws, etc.) from them and they simply accept it.

2.  They attack open source based on claims that have been given to them and that in many cases are not accurate.

3.  They do not have the will to investigate their products / leaders and take them as religious people take dogmas.

4.  They lack the scientific need to investigate and learn.  How many times they reject open source based solely on the claim that they "do not want to learn anything new"?

5.  They prefer to put up with the flaws of their software because "that's how things are".

6.  They are are not allowed to actually get into the depths of the software they use nor have the opportunity to change it.

7.  They let a specific corporation use them to its will and they happily keep giving this company as much money it asks from them, regardless of the product they receive.

Again, closed source advocates are more a religion in my perspective.  At least I have the freedom to choose and I will not go to software hell if I decide not to keep supporting a specific open source tool.

martes, 25 de abril de 2017

PicarOS Diego 2017 Is Out?

What a surprise!  I learned that there was a release of PicarOS 2017 this month!

If you don't know PicarOS and you like GNU/Linux and have children, you're missing a jewel.  This is a GalPon MiniNO version made especially for children and with education in mind.  In my opinion, it is the most complete Linux distro for kids, and it is extremely attractive for them. Children love it!

The best part is that it is a fully featured system. I like to use it myself, and anytime I do, people get interested in this beautiful distro.  Too bad it receives so little attention from the media.

In terms of new features, I noticed that now it comes with the option of a 32-bit kernel, PAE, or a 64-bit one.  Nice!
The window buttons tell you you are running Compiz


To be honest, I did not see any extreme changes in PicarOS 2017, except that the minino-compiz feature seems to be missing in the menus.  Still, you can launch it manually.


I have to keep testing it to see what else is new.  Thanks, PicarOS developers!!



sábado, 15 de abril de 2017

When My New Laptop Lost its Home...

I bought a new laptop from a Linux vendor some time ago.  The machine is a beast and it comes with a SSD for the root system and a HD for the home system. One day, I noticed that I could not enter my session. 

After some checking, I realized that the machine was not reading the HD.  The BIOS did not show the entry for that drive.  Weird.

Now, what do you do with a computer like that?  Can you use it for working?

Of course!  I could log into a session from the root system and work from there.  Also, I could use my the clone of my system that I carry on a live USB pendrive.  Thus, the problem, although weird, did not stop me from working.

Later on Mechatotoro took my laptop to a repair shop and, as I thought, it all was caused by a hardware issue: the HD had somehow gone loose. Once it was put back into place, everything was normal again.

What did I learn from that experience?  That Linux is simply great!  While another OS would tell you that you cannot use the computer, with Linux I could keep working although the home system was unreachable.   

martes, 21 de marzo de 2017

Document Freedom Day

Document Freedom Day will be in a week.  What is DFD?

According to documentfreedom.org , it is:

"the international day of Open Standards and happens every year on the last Wednesday of March. It is a day to come together and raise attention towards the ever growing importance of Open Standards for all aspects of our digital communication and information accessibility."

I remember that once, I celebrated it sending to all my colleagues a "freedom test".  It was just a regular mail with a short explanation and an .odt file.  If they could not open it, they could realize that they were not free.  My small campaign had a modest rate of success, at least to make people question their choices.

I wonder if I should do something similar this year... 

lunes, 20 de febrero de 2017

How to: VLC can't Resize Videos!

Yesterday, I tried to watch a video on my MX-16 install.  Unfortunately, the video display was very small and trying to adjust the size of the window did not help. The video size was still the same and taking a snapshot was no use, either:
Yes! The blue rectangle IS the video playing!
Then, I tried fullsize.  I got the same little video size embedded into a big, blue rectangle the size of my whole screen.
Nice, right? The snapshot didn't even show the video!
Ah, the video behaved funny.  Trying to access the menus was a nightmare for they would appear behind the video:
Groovy! How am I supposed to read the menu?
Was this a DRM-related issue?  Or something else?  Apparently, it was something else: it was a video acceleration problem, actually.

The fix was extremely easy.  Since VLC comes with video acceleration by default, if your card is within the unlucky ones, you get what I got.  Thus, all you have to do is disabling that option.  Go to Tools, and then choose Preferences. There, look for video.  Under the Screen category, untick accelerated video output:
Here you are! Let me watch my videos peacefully!
After that, close VLC. Open it again and that pretty much takes care of the problem:
Now I can resize the window and the video display, too!
I can go fullscreen, too!  Problem solved!
Now, the second part will be to tell Dragon Player to do the same!  I've no idea how to do it there!  :P

lunes, 13 de febrero de 2017

Hello, Think Penguin! Nice to Meet You!

Well, my Zareason laptop started doing strange things after a long life of intense work and harsh conditions.  I wanted to buy another computer from them, but the model I wanted was out of stock.

Thus, I started looking for options and finally found an Adelie computer from Think Penguin that was pretty close to the computer I wanted to buy originally.

I bought it, asking for their default choice for the OS.  When I got it, I realized that it came preloaded with Ubuntu 16.10.  Since Ubuntu has never been my favorite Linux distribution, I tried to go the multiboot way, making several partitions to host different Linux flavors. 

Unfortunately, none of my distros could be installed.  I tried MX-16, which is the newest distro I have and its partitioning tool (Gparted) threw errors at me when trying to make the partitions.   As a result, I could not install anything.

Then, I decided to use the Ubuntu disk that came with the computer to do the job.  That was my first time using Ubuntu's installer and my second time using Ubuntu.  The tool did its job and thanks to that, I could install MX-16.

I've had to learn a few new tricks with this computer.  As the rep from Think Penguin told me, the computer is too new for many Linux distributions (the ones I use regularly), but I've been able to manage so far.

What about Ubuntu?  I'll keep using it and maybe I'll get used to it.  My Steam games are all there, and most run perfectly.  So do other software tools I need for work.

I'll be checking other distros with current releases to see if any can work with this computer, too.  Maybe my next test will be with Fedora?

So far, I'm very happy with this new computer.  The service at Think Penguin was excellent, too.  I'm so satisfied that I may buy a Korora laptop from them in the future.